Happy New Year with 10% terms for all our client’s until 4th February 2017!

10-percent-terms-january-2017

Happy new year, welcome back and we hope you’ve had time to recharge!

It’s that time of year again when we are offering all clients – old and new – our annual 10% terms for any placements that are made from now until 4th February 2017.

We’ve had many great applications from talented candidates looking for a new beginning so give us a shout if you are looking to fill any roles within the creative / digital / marketing / pr sector.

For our cherished candidates, we’re ready to help with any careers advice you need and to provide you with all the options to make this your year.

Let’s GO!

www.glossrecruitment.com

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Staying Safe Whilst Job Hunting by Careers Visa UK

Without sounding rather old, it doesn’t seem very long ago that job hunting was restricted to calling into the Job Centre office, buying the local newspaper, looking in shop windows (very 20th Century I know,) and all the usual speculative approaches that we used to do and still should be doing. Welcome to ‘now’ though, where Job Centres have touch-screen facilities, newspapers are online, companies are accessible from anywhere via their website, although shop windows haven’t changed much.

There are now a plethora of avenues whereby a jobseeker can access job advertisements, recruiters, head-hunters…the list is endless…all on-line! Like any other useful tool though, it is open to exploitation, there are always cyber sharks roaming the waters, always on the look-out for unwary surfers!

Legitimate Job Boards, LinkedIn (and all the other Social Media platforms) are the main hunting ground in this realm, the bait is paid work, but it is often the uninitiated that ends up being the catch-of-the-day, so before you log on, it would be good to be aware of a few basic safety measure and also a few of the scams that are out there and how you can avoid being the subject of a virtual feeding-frenzy!
Protecting Yourself – the First Step!

There is no end to the ingenuity, and length that some will go to in order to make money illegally and often at the expense of those who are just going about their everyday business, trying to earn a crust. I can’t give advice on every scam out there, but if you are reading this and something happened to you or someone you know that is not covered here, please let me know and I will include it.

Identity Theft

We have all seen the stories about this…I can only imagine how awful it would be for this to happen, and yet, all too often I get CVs through that contain sensitive, financial or ID related information. I would like to say that ID theft is rare, but my research shows that ID theft is worth about £15Billion per year in the UK alone. So if you are unsure about what you should and should not include on your CV, here is a quick tick list of things to exclude from your CV:

Date of Birth – as well as not wanting to give the recruiter anything to discriminate against, your date of birth is quite a sensitive piece of data. It is often one of the security questions asked of you if you were to call your bank or credit card company….together with your full name, this can be dynamite in the hands of ID thieves. Treat the place of your birth as confidential too.

National Insurance Number – Believe it or not, I have seen this! If anyone asks you for your National Insurance number in an application, it should raise a huge red flag…and ring an alarm bell or two. You should only need to give your National Insurance Number when you get an offer of work – usually after an interview. If you are asked for it before…Check it out with someone who knows…call your local Job Centre, they will probably want to know who is doing this, the company may even be on their radar!

Driving Licence Number – You might be tempted to do this if you work as a driver of some variety and as with your NI number, you will have to show your Driving Licence before you are allowed in a company vehicle…probably at the interview, this is normal and if there is any driving to be done in the job you are going for, then it shouldn’t give cause for concern, but don’t make it easy by including it on your CV and posting it online.

Passport Number – If you are going to work abroad for a UK company, for example, as a holiday rep, then it is prudent on the part of the recruiter to check that your passport is in order and you will be able to get to your destination in time to start work. Same as the Driving Licence though, you should only have to do this if you are invited for interview. Keep it off the CV.

Bank Account details – A candidate may run the risk of appearing supremely confident; scratch that, over-confident…even cocky, if he or she were to include this in their application. Almost as if to say ‘you don’t need to see anyone else, here are my bank details for my first month’s salary.’ If you are asked to give these details or any other financial related data before an offer of work….? You guessed it…circling sharks…sinking boat…check it out first with the Job Centre.

Photograph – If you are a model or actor / actress or entertainer of any kind, then you are likely to have headshots, a portfolio or more commonly, a website with a gallery of images. The point is, it is normal to have a photo in your application for some types of work.

If you are asked for a photo in advance, it may be a cause for concern…there are all kinds of reasons why someone in I.T. for instance, would need to provide a photo. For an I.D. card, to be included on a company website under ‘Meet the Team.’ Never give your photo in advance. The other aspect of this is, unless the photo is professionally taken, it may give the wrong impression of you. I got one CV through with a photo…the person was on a night out!! Totally wrong impression!!

This list is not exhaustive, there could be any number of information you could be asked for in advance that seem a little sensitive, just check out the reasons why it is needed and verify what they tell you with an impartial source… a couple of other mentions you should avoid are Marital Status, number of children and nationality. If you need any advice on this, give me a quick call.

To summarise, keep the details on your CV to relevant only. When posting your CV online, it becomes ‘public domain’ and the details stay public pretty much forever, so it is best to include only basic information like your first name, town, email address (preferably a new Gmail or Yahoo account specifically set up for job hunting…and maybe a mobile number. Even if you remove your CV after an unwise posting, you have no idea of who has done a quick smash and grab ‘copy and paste’ hit on your CV!

Phishing Scams
You may well be aware of other kinds of phishing scams, but I am afraid that this kind of fraud has infiltrated the world of recruitment. As if it isn’t hard enough looking for work, the last thing you need is to get caught up in this kind of trap.
So what is a Phishing Scam?
We are pretty much conditioned into recognising logos, brands and icons, and it is kind of what you look for to make sure that you are in the right place. Shops, banks and other organisations use certain types of imagery to identify their product, but to anyone with any web-building skill, it is so easy to fabricate a fairly similar, even an exact clone of any website, but just because it looks like the Job Site you always use, doesn’t mean to say that it is authentic.
To give you an example, I am a regular user of Amazon, so I get emails from Amazon, promoting various books, and films that I may like to buy, based on previous purchases. If I see something I like, I don’t open my browser and type https://www.amazon.co.uk in there, I just click the link, usually, the logo at the top of the email.
A few weeks back though, I got what I thought (correctly) was a phishing email that looked like it was from Amazon, but it wasn’t! The email was basically telling me that a £600 TV was about to be dispatched to me…which was odd, because I had purchased no such thing. A pound to a penny, if I clicked the link I would have arrived at a site that looked like Amazon, but would have probably asked me to confirm several things, like my bank card number and other such financially sensitive data…a further check would have revealed the domain name in the URL bar to be nothing like Amazon’s address…I deleted it immediately after checking Amazon’s advice on potential phishing emails.
So to translate this into what we are talking about here, you may get an email from someone claiming to have seen your CV or profile or some other such description on http://www.yourfavouritejobhuntingsite.co.uk – and you have been matched to a job – “Click Here for More.” When you (and please don’t) click, you may arrive at what appears to be your favourite job site, but does the URL address agree with where you think you are? Are you being asked just to ‘verify’ a couple of details in order to see the job.
Be very wary when linking directly from email…just give it a check to make sure you are where you think you are. If you fish for phish…all you will get is Shark!!

There is so much more to this topic, there is a full guide available though, just drop me an email and I will send it over for free…keep safe!!

http://www.careervisa.co.uk/

Dave Smith Careers Visa

Dave Smith of Career Visa UK is our leading authority when it comes to personal careers advice.

He has worked in the UK recruitment industry since 1991 and is now an expert Jobsearch Consultant specialising in CV creation and improvement. If you need help in preparing to enter the Job Market for the first time or are planning on a career change – simply get in touch via his website http://www.careervisa.co.uk/. You can also read more at his online blog at http://careervisa.blogspot.com/

Successful Networking

networking

Good old networking – everybody is doing it – from Managing Directors to Jobseekers.  If I could have a pound for every networking event I have either been to or been invited to, I’d have….well, certainly enough for a good curry and a night at the Cinema, but just what is networking and why should we be doing it if we are looking for work?

Simply put – it is interacting with a support system in order to achieve mutual goals.  Your goal is to get a job, but you may be able to help others with their goals…in the case of recruiters – their goal is to fill jobs and obtain details of outstanding candidates for the near future…namely…you!

Like any kind of marketing, there are cold contacts and warm contacts.

Warm Contacts

These are the best…the friendliest, and quite honestly, the easiest – you know these people, they know you, so it should be pretty easy to get in touch and see what they know.  But where are they?

  • Friends and family – Oh yes!  When you are looking for work, this is your first port-of-call, these are the people who, not only may be ABLE to help, but will certainly WANT to help, get the family jungle drums going, who knows what will turn up.
  • Former Colleagues – If you are looking in the same industry as you have previously worked, then this would be just as important.  Clearly, these first two groups may overlap somewhat, but what about those former colleagues who have moved away?  One word for you….LinkedIn!  A perfect way to contact former friends and colleagues…need help with this?  Email me, I will send you a free guide.
  • Facebook or Twitter is the other arena you need to explore seriously – or whichever your preferred Social Media tipple is, this will contain all of the above along with everything else besides.

Cold Contacts

OK, this is a bit of a scarier prospect…but hold it!!  Before you retreat back into your tortoise shell, bear in mind that the figures show high percentages of jobs are snaffled up by savvy networkers.  (I’m not going to quote vague statistics to you but I have researched anywhere between 50% and 80% is accurate – depending on your chosen industry.)

  • Job and Career Fairs – you will find everyone under one roof here, people looking for candidates and people looking for tables to get their feet under.  A word to the wise…if you go to one, treat it as an interview – preened, prompt and prepared.  Let me know if you want a free interview guide.
  • The Hidden Job Market!  This is not MI5, this is the new name for Speculative Job Hunting…the cold approach.  Scary?  Oh yes…but guess what?  I have a guide…

Etiquette

The last thing you want is to get the reputation of a pest.  Networking is not just about what you can gain from the contact, but also what you can give.  In fact, it is better to offer your services before asking anything in return – you may even find a person much more helpful once you have at least offered your help.
Of course there are many other avenues of networking, so if you want to talk further, pick up the phone or drop me an email…if you’re reading this – I’m already a warm contact.

 

http://www.careervisa.co.uk/

Dave Smith Careers Visa

Dave Smith of Career Visa UK is our leading authority when it comes to personal careers advice.

He has worked in the UK recruitment industry since 1991 and is now an expert Jobsearch Consultant specialising in CV creation and improvement. If you need help in preparing to enter the Job Market for the first time or are planning on a career change – simply get in touch via his website http://www.careervisa.co.uk/. You can also read more at his online blog at http://careervisa.blogspot.com/

How to Be a Writer (Part Three): How to Get Rejected by the BBC (and other production companies)

Writing

By Ingrid Boyd

 

My, the BBC is having a bit of a time of it aren’t they? I would like to say I feel bad for them, but I don’t. I am secretly a tiny bit pleased because they have toyed with my emotions for kicks one time too many.

 

You have finished your TV drama. That’s marvellous, but now what? You need to sell it, of course.

 

There are various routes to the mythical nirvana of actually persuading someone to give you cash money to take your teleplay and bring it to life, using actors who have either played a corpse in Holby City, or a shoplifter in The Bill.

 

(That covers most British actors by the way, leaving only the cast of Downton Abbey, who are the crème de la Menthe of British drama)

 

When you have written your first TV script your first port of call may well be the BBC writersroom, which is the only point of entry to that venerable institution for the un-agented writer, and the place, so they say, where new talent is nurtured.

 

Once you have sent your script, you will feel it is only a matter of time before you get the call, inviting you down to London to that all important first meeting with a commissioning editor, where you will iron out the minor plot points, and discuss the necessity of casting Ray Winstone.

 

Four  months of total silence from the Beeb and finally you receive a letter. It’s from them! This totally puts into shade the time your cousin Donna wrote into Blue Peter and got a badge. This is an actually letter, addressed to you, from The Telly!

 

Unfortunately inside is what they call a script report detailing everything that is wrong with your script, and explaining why, this time, they will not be “taking things further” with your work.

 

Once you have adjusted yourself to the unexpected shock of rejection, read the report thoroughly to find out exactly how you have alienated Auntie to this extent.

 

Your first mistake may have been not setting your drama in either a hospital or a police station. This is a classic beginner’s mistake.

 

An important part of creating a series than can run and run, is to set it somewhere where you can keep bringing in new characters , and have multiple storylines running simultaneously. Hospitals and Police stations are great places to do this in a somewhat realistic fashion.

 

What about the characters in your opus? Have you made the error of having more than one working class character of the same gender in your drama? It’s worth remembering that the BBC is entirely run by young Oxbridge grads called Lucy, who can get very confused by the fact that your script has two characters who both speak in the idiom of the common man. Lucy may feel that these characters do not have enough to differentiate between them. Especially if they are both called Paul.

 

There may also be some comments about the structure of your masterpiece. Remember all those books you half read about how to write a successful screenplay?  The inciting incident, in other words the thing that happens to kick off the drama in the first place, MUST take place by page 3. Or is it page 5? Pretty quickly anyway.

 

The trouble is, that, what with “our busy lifestyles” and, what telly channels like to call “multi platform programming” there is a lot of broadcast media out there to choose from.

 

As a result, the people who make television are getting increasingly antsy about their audience’s attention span.

 

The rule used to be that a show would need to grab the audience’s attention within the first 3 minutes.

 

Now it is 12 seconds. After that, apparently, your fickle viewer may well switch off in favour of online bingo.

 

This fear of losing audiences has led to some very expedient plotting, to the extent that you seem to be in the thick of the action before you have even got the wrapper off your Toblerone.

 

The other thing that all the books and screen writing courses teach you, is that there must be no exposition ever, so we are now at a point where everything on TV drama is shown in a fleeting, almost minimalist series of scenes, very little is said, and then suddenly you realise you have literally no idea what is going on. This is exactly what they want.

 

So, your inciting incident was too late, there was far too much dialogue (or “not enough white on the page” as they say in The Biz), and your characters are interchangeable.

 

Oh well, better luck next time. And remember; only 1 in 10 submissions to BBC writersroom actually get feedback at all, so hold your head high, and take your place among the honourably rejected.

 

Lastly, despite the fact that, however much TV production companies say they want new ideas, but actually want more of the same, the rules sometimes do need to be broken.

 

The famous quote (first coined by the Hollywood screenwriter William Goldman) about what sells in Hollywood is “nobody knows anything”, and while it would seem more comforting if somebody, somewhere knew something, it is probably true.

 

 

Ingrid Boyd

Ingrid is a native of Leeds and a graduate of the University of Westminster Film School, where she learned much about filmmaking; the most important lesson being never to admit a film crew into your house.

She has lived in Glasgow, London, Oxford and New York, and has worked (among other places)at Merchant Ivory Films, (doing the filing), in a diner, as a costume assistant on musicals, and in a department store, where she once sold a pair of socks to Bruce Springstein.

In 2007 Ingrid returned to Leeds to study writing at the University of Leeds, where she successfully wrote and directed a play, and began to compile an impressive portfolio of writing, from screenplays to short stories.

After graduating with merit in 2009, Ingrid began copywriting and blogging for a range of small businesses.

How to Be a Writer (Part 2): What to Write About

Writing

By Ingrid Boyd

This may sound really obvious, and please, stop me if you have heard this before, but when deciding what you want to write, do take a moment to think about what you actually enjoying reading, or watching.

So you are planning to write the definitive historical romance, but with a contemporary twist? You haven’t sorted out what the contemporary twist will be, but there will definitely be one.

But, do you read historical romances? If not are you sure you want to write one?

So what do you like? TV drama? Excellent. Do that then.

If you decide to write for film or television you must be aware of the vast array of books written on the subject.

There are many, many books out there from the venerable Sid Field to the fantastic Linda Aronson. There are also courses, run by, apparently powerful Hollywood TV writers, who are so successful they are running 3 day workshops from a conference centre in Newquay to teach YOU how to write a script that SELLS.

Once you have read through a great big pile of books telling you “How To” (we are back at procrastination, aren’t we? That always happens. Trust me it’s normal. Go with it), you can come up with some ideas.

This brings me back to the other question writers get asked all the time: How do you get your ideas?

You will undoubtedly have heard the phrase “write about what you know”. Good. Now forget it. Sure, it helps to have an interest in the subject you are writing about, but to stick rigidly only within the, let’s face it, tiny parameters of your own young life seems a little narrow.

Yes, you do have to know what you are writing about, but you can always GET to know about something. It’s called research. I hate it too, but look, in this day and age it’s so easy! In the dark ages before the internet (you won’t remember, you were just a tot but it was AWFUL) we had to go to libraries and learn the Dewey Decimal system just to find stuff out.

Now we all we have to do is click a mouse and VOILA! Can’t find what you are looking for? Remember Google has more than one page.

Actually, though, even when you research online, you kind of do need to be able to substantiate that research. Wikipedia is great, and often correct, but not always, and facts do need to be checked to.

Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone to call people. For example, when researching a scene I was writing that took place in a police cell, I called the Metropolitan police to make sure I was getting the procedure right. You can do this. All large organisations have people who are paid to deal with press and media related queries, and they are usually very helpful

So, OK, so maybe you can’t get everything from the internet, but it’s a good place to start.

You now know what format you want to write in, and you have a good idea who your characters are going to be and what they are going be like. Now you just need to formulate a story, come up with the Big Idea.

Whatever you do, don’t turn off the computer, or put down your notebook in order to wait for the right ideas to present themselves, or for the writing mood to take you.

The writing mood is elusive, and often doesn’t take you until you are drunk at 1 am and you fill a notebook with amazingly profound ideas for a story, which, when read back in the morning turns out to be an overlong synopsis of Atonement, covered in chilli sauce.

Someone once asked me, following a performance of a play I wrote, which quite brought down the Scout shed, “How do you start writing?”.

I replied, “You just start writing”. She was confused. “But how do you know what you are going to write? Where do you get your ideas”?

And I said, again, Yoda-like, “You just, you know, pick up a pen or whatever, and start writing”

And IT’S TRUE. It took me years to get that, but, once you kind of know what and who you want to write about, and you have a basic story arc in mind (thanks Sid Field) there is no merit in sitting and waiting for inspiration.

The more you actually write, the more ideas you will generate, and the more you work, the easier it will get to wrench open that door in your mind that lets the creative stuff in. And the more that rusty ol’ door gets used, the easier it will become to just leave it a little ajar most of the time.

They say creative enterprise is 1 percent Inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.

This is completely wrong, of course as we have seen.

It is more like 100 percent desperation followed by a 50/49 split between perspiration and procrastination. The remaining 1 percent is tea and biscuits.

Ingrid Boyd

Ingrid is a native of Leeds and a graduate of the University of Westminster Film School, where she learned much about filmmaking; the most important lesson being never to admit a film crew into your house.

She has lived in Glasgow, London, Oxford and New York, and has worked (among other places)at Merchant Ivory Films, (doing the filing), in a diner, as a costume assistant on musicals, and in a department store, where she once sold a pair of socks to Bruce Springstein.

In 2007 Ingrid returned to Leeds to study writing at the University of Leeds, where she successfully wrote and directed a play, and began to compile an impressive portfolio of writing, from screenplays to short stories.

After graduating with merit in 2009, Ingrid began copywriting and blogging for a range of small businesses.

How to Be a Writer (part one): The Art of Procrastination.

Writing

 

By Ingrid Boyd

So you think you want to be a writer? You are tired of the daily grind of the rush hour; you are done with customer service and PowerPoint presentations and yearn for a better, more creative job.

Initially this charmed lifestyle will mainly involve not having to change out of your pyjamas, but in the future you can easily imagine the interview with the Sunday Times in your gracious study full of books, your glasses hanging around your neck as you explain just why so many millions have connected with the characters in your novels.

You are not alone.

“Being a writer” is the most sought after profession of them all, coming top in some survey I read once, which I will look up later. In fact, you could probably Google it for yourself, and then maybe let me know? Thanks.

Everything about being a writer seems appealing, doesn’t it? From the comfy leisure wear, to the fact that people will actually be interested in what goes on in your brain, right down to the shed in the garden which you will have converted into a fully heated writing room complete with chaise longue for resting on while you allow your muse to do her thing.

Great. Now you know what you want. Only thing to do now is get started. Hold on, not so fast there Skippy.

If you really want to be a writer you can’t just get on with it. God no. It’s not that simple.

First of all, you can’t possible start in this house. It’s a complete mess. The bathroom hasn’t been cleaned since your Nan last visited. Was that really two months ago? She’ll be back again at Christmas. Actually, Christmas is coming up quite soon isn’t it, so before you get started on the bathroom perhaps you better check the fairy lights still work.

Remember last year, banging on the glass and flailing your arms at Wilkos at 5 pm on Christmas Eve, mouthing “a hundred coloured lights!” at the burly shop staff who wouldn’t let you in.

The lady police officer who gave you the cup of tea was lovely though.

OK, the bathroom is clean. Time to get on. Is it really that time already? No wonder you are so hungry. You will have to make a sandwich. Your brain just won’t function at all without fuel.

Might as well turn on Loose Women while you have your lunch. Ten minutes, tops, then you will switch it off. Why on earth is Denise wearing that PVC shell top? She looks like a bulldog chewing its way out of a bin bag.

Oops, watched the whole thing. Ok, focus. Focus.

Hang on.

What are you going to write on? It is a truth universally acknowledged that the questions all writers get asked by their public over and over are “where do you write” and “What do you write with” coming second only to where do you get your ideas?” (But I’ll get to that. At some point.)

Why does it matter? Well, probably because most of us have been writing in some form since around age 5, and so we feel that there must be some different, magic sort of writing that proper writers do, some ritual or tool we are not party to.

Better Google some of your favourite writers, just to get some tips about their way of working. Wow. They all say they get up at six am, walk the dog on the beach and then write longhand until lunch, before continuing until 4 pm.

Yes, yes, that sounds like the way to do it. Disciplined. Wait though, this best selling Chick Lit author says she writes in bed. Hmmm. Yes, that seems much more you, doesn’t it? Freer, more relaxed.

OK, got your laptop. Just prop some pillows…aahh. That’s nice. Close your eyes and let your mind open.

Wha..? Is it dark outside?? I know, you were only resting your eyes. It happens.

Well that was a waste of a day. You will have to start again tomorrow. Really early, just get up, no coffee, nothing, switch on the laptop and go.

Well, maybe coffee. No breakfast telly though. Except the news, obviously…

 

Ingrid Boyd

Ingrid is a native of Leeds and a graduate of the University of Westminster Film School, where she learned much about filmmaking; the most important lesson being never to admit a film crew into your house.

She has lived in Glasgow, London, Oxford and New York, and has worked (among other places)at Merchant Ivory Films, (doing the filing), in a diner, as a costume assistant on musicals, and in a department store, where she once sold a pair of socks to Bruce Springstein.

In 2007 Ingrid returned to Leeds to study writing at the University of Leeds, where she successfully wrote and directed a play, and began to compile an impressive portfolio of writing, from screenplays to short stories.

After graduating with merit in 2009, Ingrid began copywriting and blogging for a range of small businesses.

 

 

Bending in the Wind! Surviving in a Tough Climate

Blowing in the wind

I thought it would be appropriate to begin 2013 with a Chinese proverb “Trees that do not bend in the wind won’t last the storm.”  A bit random?  The general forecast for 2013 and the Employment Market is a little bit – not exactly stormy – but growth is not really predicted, in fact, my own research tends towards a slight rise in unemployment, which in real terms means that if you are looking for work…the competition will get a little tougher this year.

Am I trying to depress?  Absolutely not!!  And how does this proverb help?

 

Simply put, the tree survives by not fighting the external pressure put upon it.  It can’t change the wind, but it accommodates it, making changes to itself.  So what does this mean in practice?  There is not a great deal that we can do – individually – to change the UK Employment prospects, what we can do is make changes to ourselves….how so?

 

First of all…ignore the forecast as much as you can, it isn’t good for morale or your motivation levels, there is nothing you can do about the state of the economy.  What you can do is ‘bend’ in order to survive!  Allow me to relate a very well-coined phrase, often heard in the offices of JobCentre Plus…”there’s no jobs!”  Yet, during my time with this noble institution I spoke with many people across the network that suggested that in their office, there were more vacancies than there were Job Seekers.  This was not the case in every area and just because there appears to be more vacancies than job seekers does not mean that they are full time or even decent vacancies.  More recent statistics suggest that that are (countrywide) more unemployed people than there are jobs at the moment, but it is dangerous to look at statistics to get a completely accurate picture.

 

For example, a Jobcentre could be advertising three vacancies on one day – one could attract 200 applicants, one could attract 20 applicants and the other could attract zero applicants – statistics would suggest that each vacancy attracted 74ish applicants…but that isn’t true.  If you would like a real rant on statistics and how they can mislead, get in touch via email!!  Suffice to relate the old adage ‘Lies, damn lies and statistics!’

 

Secondly, you should review your own goals in line with how well (or poorly) your own industry is performing at the moment.  ‘There are no jobs’ could really mean that there are fewer jobs within the industry at the moment.  This does not mean that this will be the case forever!  Could you do something else in the meantime?  The worst thing to have on your CV is a gap – a sudden (apparent) about-turn mid-career is easier to explain than a gaping wound.

 

If you cannot change your job…could you change within your industry.  In recent years, more and more roles are being Outsourced, this is viewed negatively by some, not so by the free-lancers who are willing (and financially able) to pick up the slack and set up as a consultant within their sphere of expertise.

 

Thirdly…and back to statistics, and please do not accuse me of being cynical or mercenary.  Just because a person is registered as a job seeker does not mean that he or she is actually doing any seeking of jobs…I know, shocking right?  It is a fact that, because of a million and one reasons too complex to go into here, not all who appear to be competitors are in fact…competitors.  Whilst it appears we are doing battle with two point something million battle-hardened job seeking veterans….we’re not!!

 

It all comes back to what we are doing as an individual to improve our Candidate-appeal.  At the risk of repeating myself.  Up-to-date, cutting edge CV, online presence, Social Media networking etc etc.  Interview preparation…more of the same, but the point is – if you are not having success at the moment – don’t give up and keep bending.

 

http://www.careervisa.co.uk/

Dave Smith Careers Visa

Dave Smith of Career Visa UK is our leading authority when it comes to personal careers advice.

He has worked in the UK recruitment industry since 1991 and is now an expert Jobsearch Consultant specialising in CV creation and improvement. If you need help in preparing to enter the Job Market for the first time or are planning on a career change – simply get in touch via his website http://www.careervisa.co.uk/. You can also read more at his online blog at http://careervisa.blogspot.com/