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Gloss Creative Recruitment Salary Survey Results 2015

stairs up rising challenge

Introduction

Welcome to our latest and much anticipated annual salary survey!

We bring you our latest salary findings from candidates that have passed our comprehensive filtering process to make it onto the Gloss ‘cream of the crop’ database for 2015! Focusing on salaries from across the Digital / Creative / Marketing and PR industries, it gives us great pleasure to present to you an analysis and summary on what these figures represent to our local industry.

Economy    

We’ve had two record breaking years thanks to the upturn in the economy allowing many of our Yorkshire based clients to expand. Growth has been far reaching across many sectors; however, this climatic acceleration is bringing about a few new challenges too.

A broad spectrum of our clients, both agency and inhouse, have been recruiting for permanent or short term contracts due to expansion. As a result, demand for essential specialised talent has been high. This rise in requirements has seen the pendulum shift in momentum from companies to candidates, creating a candidate short market (especially around the middleweight level) and a corresponding effect on salaries.

Design

For what seems like an awful long time (around 8 years) the market is finally moving with rising wages.  Stagflation has been the message in the past few years but we can definitely confirm that salaries are undoubtedly rising (see below).

The biggest trend within design has been the major skills shortages beginning to emerge within certain pockets of the sector.  This lack of available talent is now becoming apparent for those that specialise within creative and print.

Graphic design salaries are gradually beginning to come in line with digital design salaries which, is unprecedented!  Traditional Graphic designers can now rejoice in the lifting of the salary ceiling that has been held in place for nearly a decade.

Digital

There has been continued demand for digital experts both in-house and agency, with shortages still evident across a range of different technical skill sets. Salaries, however, have not moved a great deal…yet!  Watch this space, as we predict this could change very soon!

The digital sector is being stretched thin with lack of supply (which used to be limited to more back end, coding positions) now becoming apparent within front end developer and digital web design roles. Interestingly, salaries haven’t moved up a great deal on the technical positions but more within the creative / designer roles.

There has been a scarcity of strong, commercially viable and cutting edge portfolios (mostly from MW level upwards) and we do believe that it won’t be long before salaries will jump in this sector soon if the trend continues.

These present conditions indicate that it is still possible to incentivise web candidates away from their current situation with a much anticipated pay rise – something that might be worth doing sooner before market forces raise them organically in the very near future!

Marketing, PR, Social and Copywriting

The leading trend observed in this division has been the swing from agency candidates switching to inhouse roles. With digital, social media and analytics taking centre stage, digital marketing is now the predominant engine of growth for many companies and many of our larger clients in particular, have been looking to bring these functions in house.

Shortages are now prevalent (again from the middleweight range upwards) in account handlers, PR and copywriting candidates. Another observation has been the rise in marketing agency salaries which, are now starting to catch up with equivalent inhouse positions…another first within a decade.

Finally, many senior permanent (and some less experienced) creative candidates have turned to a life of freelance in the pursuit of a modern work /life balance!  Those that do, stipulate the chance to earn more money and to be able to enjoy a more flexible working lifestyle as the main reason.   It’s another good sign of market sentiment as candidates take this route out of choice and not out of necessity as we have seen in previous years.

Please take a look below at some of our findings and don’t hesitate to get in touch if you would like us to find out anything specific to do with salaries in your particular market.  We are always grateful to receive any feedback or comments on our efforts/thoughts/reflections and hope this latest survey is of some use to you.

Trends           

Key trends:

  1. Rise in salaries for traditional / print / branding sector but not so in digital.
  2. Agency salaries have caught up with inhouse salaries.
  3. Low availability of candidates especially around the middleweight level.

Salaries

Job Min (£K) Max (£K) Ave (£K) Comments
Artworkers        
Junior Artworker (1 to 3 years) 15 20 17.22 Definite rise
MW Artworker (3 to 5 years) 18 24 20.4 Candidate shortage, raised salaries
Senior Artworker (5 years+) 20 30 23.3 Definite rise
Studio Manager 25 35 31.3 Definite rise
 
Designers    
Junior Designers Agency (1 to 3 years) 14 20 17.7 Definite rise
Junior Designers Inhouse (1 to 3 years) 15 22 17.6 No change
MW Designers Agency (3 to 5 years) 18 27 22 Candidate shortage, raised salaries
MW Designers Inhouse (3 to 5 years) 19 28 23.5 Candidate shortage, raised salaries
Senior Designers Agency (5 years+) 24 35 28.4 Definite rise
Senior Designers Inhouse (5 years+) 24 30 26.2 Slight rise
Design Manager 28 35 30.1 No change
Creative Director 35 45 37.5 Candidate shortage, no change
 
Job Min (£K) Max (£K) Ave (£K) Comments
Marketing (Agency)    
Account Execs 16 24 18.44 Candidate shortage, No change
Account Managers 24 32 29 Candidate shortage, raised salaries
Account Directors 40 50 45 Candidate shortage, raised salaries
 
Marketing (Inhouse)    
Exec 15 24 19.5 No change
Manager 26 40 31.2 Slight rise
Director 45 64 54.3 Definite rise
 
Web Design        
Junior Designer (1 to 3 years) 15 24 18.5 Candidate shortage, no change
MW Designer (3 to 5 years) 20 28 23.2 Candidate shortage, no change
Senior Designer (5 years+) 25 32 30 Candidate shortage, no change
 
Digital Marketing (Agency)  
Exec 18 26 22.2 Candidate shortage, no change
Manager 25 40 29.7 Slight rise
Director 50 60+ 52.5 Definite rise
 
Digital Marketing (Inhouse)  
Exec 16 25 20.7 Candidate shortage, no change
Manager 24 40 31.8 Candidate shortage, no change
Director 40 65+ 50 Candidate shortage, no change
 
Content 15 25 20 No change
PPC 16 45 24 Candidate shortage, no change
SEO 15 40 25.3 Candidate shortage, no change
 
PR Roles        
PR Executive 15 25 20.3 Candidate shortage, raised salaries
PR Manager 21 35 29.1 Candidate shortage, raised salaries
Comms 18 35 25.3 No change
 
Junior Copywriter 18 23 19.5 Definite rise
MW Copywriter 20 27 23.1 Definite rise
Senior Copywriter 24 38 30.6 Definite rise

Sources

The data summarised in this survey has been collated from candidates that have registered with our agency within the last year and are based on actual submitted salaries rather than the upper limit of client job specs. Please note that Gloss Creative Recruitment operates on Permanent and contract positions both Inhouse and agency only within the Yorkshire area.

For more information please visit www.glossrecruitment.com or call us on 0870 321 9788

Gong Hei Fat Choi everyone!

 

Image

 

Happy Chinese New Year to eveyone – the year of the Horse! Check out your Chinese Horoscope here to see what’s in store (taken from http://www.chinesefortunecalendar.com/2014/2014Zodiac.htm

Horse is one of Chinese favorite animals. Horse provides a good and quick transportation for people before automobiles. Horse can give people a ride to their destination. Therefore, horse is not only a symbol of traveling, but also a sign of speedy success.

Horses like to compete with others. They pursuit for their freedom, passion and leadership. Therefore, people will have busy schedule for their goal in the year of Horse. Horse hour of Chinese Horoscopes is from 11 A.M. to 1 P.M. Sunshine generates lots of heat during Horse hour. Therefore, horse is connected to heat, hot, fire and red. Horses like the social activities, because horses like show off themselves. Since horse is a social animal and red is also connected to love, therefore. horse is treated as a Romantic Star in Chinese Horoscope.

Chinese wouldn’t let horse to the farm work. Instead, all the farmland jobs go to the ox. This is because Chinese have higher expectation on horses. Horses can help human to win the battle. Sitting on the Horse back implies that the person is from noble or higher ranking family. So people born in the Horse year usually care about their dressing, outlook and speech.

Horse is intelligent animal. Horses need to be trained to become useful to human. Human can make Horse famous. Without human’s guide, Horse just a wild animal. It doesn’t know where to go. There is no destination in its life.

In Chinese Five Element theory, Horse is in the Fire group. Horse month is in the middle of summer. Horse is the strongest Fire animal in 12 zodiacs. 2014 is year of Wooden Horse. Wood can help Fire to burn. So Fire can last longer. When Horse meets Tiger and Dog, then they will form even stronger Fire. Too much Fire implies the hot temper and no patient. If the element of Fire is favorable to the person, then the person should have a good fortune in 2014. If Fire is unfavorable to the person, then 2014 will bring big trouble to the person. More information about Chinese Five Element astrology page is at 2014 Chinese Horoscope – The Year of Green Horse.

Salary Survey results 2013

Introduction

We are coming towards the end of another eventful (and fast moving) year, and it’s been interesting to say the least!   The market appears to be constantly evolving ……… take a look at our salary survey as we focus on salaries across the Digital/Creative/ Marketing and PR industry from November 2012 to November 2013. Gain an insight into our findings, thoughts and reflections and some of the changes that we have discovered along the way.  We hope this year’s endeavour is of some use to you!

Amongst all this talk of change there is one unfortunate aspect that has remained the same – salaries have still not gone up.  Whilst the media have been pushing news on how the economy is growing and jobless rates are going down (if you are in the South East), the biggest issue most of our candidates have been facing this year (and the last few before) is that salaries appear to have stagnated. It would seem that the North is experiencing an element of “stagflation” as our results show that most salaries are not rising at all in line with inflation, and in some sectors of the industry, candidates salaries are actually going backwards.  Please read on to see our findings with a few comments to see where this has happened….

With regards to jobs, this year has been one of the busiest we have ever had in what is our 7th year of business. Roles have been much less technically orientated compared to last year’s jobs, with a greater emphasis on content, copywriting, design and online marketing. Results point towards a significant jump from in-house clients looking to move away from outsourcing their digital marketing  in order to bring these services in-house.

Demand for print design and traditional marketing has continued as many companies now have their technical teams in place and are concentrating more on branding compared to last year’s findings. Industry wise, retail has still been a strong market for us but this time a much larger chunk was from newer E-commerce companies as well as our older, more established clients.

One of the biggest obstacles we have had to deal with, has been the severe lack of good Search candidates available – where have they gone? Whilst there has been no shortage of vacancies requiring strong SEO or PPC experience, there has simply been a huge shortage of candidates for these posts.  For this reason, we are unable to include statistics for those salaries this year…there simply isn’t enough data.  Of those candidates that have joined Gloss this year, the biggest shortfall within Search is coming from the lack of junior candidates entering the market.  This is having a knock on effect on the rest of the division – a bit like the UK property market last year (maybe the government should issue a “help to Search” policy)!

Finally, job board advertising has been on a slippery slope for the last 12 months: we still received plenty of applications but the quality candidate responses within them have fallen reiterating a greater emphasis on networking, “head hunting” and passive candidate communication. The bottom line for most of our clients is that they haven’t got the time to train new recruits and therefore need to employ candidates with those skills already in place.  As a result of this, clients have encountered the salary issue previously mentioned – good candidates will normally require a salary raise and clients are struggling to afford them.  It’s a catch 22 situation that will hopefully be rectified soon as more junior candidates do what it takes to get relevant work experience and companies become able to raise salaries in line with (real) inflation.

Trends  

Key trends:

1. Rise in content, copy and branding roles.

2. Severe lack of digital search (PPC and SEO) candidates

3. Not enough movement in salaries / benefits to attract “wish list” applications

Salaries

Job Minimum Maximum Average Comments
Artworkers        
Junior artworker (1 to 3 years)

14

20

15.4

Similar to 2012
MW Artworker (3 to 5 years)

18

21

19.5

Similar to 2012
Senior Artworker (5 years+)

15

26

21

Less than 2012
Studio Manager

20

40

26.5

Less than 2012
 
Designers    
Junior Designers Agency (1 to 3 years)

11

18

16

Small improvement to 2012
Junior Designers Inhouse (1 to 3 years)

12

20

17

Similar to 2012
MW Designers Agency (3 to 5 years)

17

25

20.5

Similar to 2012
MW Designers Inhouse (3 to 5 years)

15

30

22.4

Small improvement to 2012
Senior Designers Agency (5 years+)

20

30

25.3

Similar to 2012
Senior Designers Inhouse (5 years+)

20

30

25.5

Small improvement to 2012
 
Marketing (Agency)    
Account Execs

15

25

20.1

Small improvement to 2012
Account Managers

22

30

26.4

Less than 2012
Account Directors

30

40

36.6

Less than 2012
 
Marketing (Inhouse)    
Exec

14

25

19.4

Less than 2012
Manager

23

35

28.2

Less than 2012
Director

40

66

48.8

Similar to 2012
 
Web Design        
Junior Designer (1 to 3 years)

13

24

19.5

Similar to 2012
MW Designer (3 to 5 years)

19

28

23.7

Similar to 2012
Senior Designer (5 years+)

27

35

30.4

Similar to 2012
 
Digital Marketing  
Exec

16.5

25

21.75

Similar to 2012
Manager

18

35

27.3

Similar to 2012
Director

30

55

40.5

Less than 2012
Content

14

25

20

Large rise in vacancies
 
PR Roles        
PR Executive

12

25

17

Similar to 2012
PR Manager

22

27

25

Similar to 2012
PR Director

26

35

30.5

Similar to 2012
     
Junior Copywriter

12

18

15.4

Similar to 2012
MW Copywriter

17

26

21.7

Similar to 2012
Senior Copywriter

18

33

27.8

Similar to 2012

Sources

The data summarised in this survey has been collated from candidates that have registered with our agency within the last year and are based on actual submitted salaries rather than the upper limit of client job specs. Please note that Gloss Creative Recruitment operates on Permanent and contract positions both Inhouse and agency only within the Yorkshire area.

For more information please visit www.glossrecruitment.com or call us on 0870 321 9788

Staying Safe Whilst Job Hunting by Careers Visa UK

Without sounding rather old, it doesn’t seem very long ago that job hunting was restricted to calling into the Job Centre office, buying the local newspaper, looking in shop windows (very 20th Century I know,) and all the usual speculative approaches that we used to do and still should be doing. Welcome to ‘now’ though, where Job Centres have touch-screen facilities, newspapers are online, companies are accessible from anywhere via their website, although shop windows haven’t changed much.

There are now a plethora of avenues whereby a jobseeker can access job advertisements, recruiters, head-hunters…the list is endless…all on-line! Like any other useful tool though, it is open to exploitation, there are always cyber sharks roaming the waters, always on the look-out for unwary surfers!

Legitimate Job Boards, LinkedIn (and all the other Social Media platforms) are the main hunting ground in this realm, the bait is paid work, but it is often the uninitiated that ends up being the catch-of-the-day, so before you log on, it would be good to be aware of a few basic safety measure and also a few of the scams that are out there and how you can avoid being the subject of a virtual feeding-frenzy!
Protecting Yourself – the First Step!

There is no end to the ingenuity, and length that some will go to in order to make money illegally and often at the expense of those who are just going about their everyday business, trying to earn a crust. I can’t give advice on every scam out there, but if you are reading this and something happened to you or someone you know that is not covered here, please let me know and I will include it.

Identity Theft

We have all seen the stories about this…I can only imagine how awful it would be for this to happen, and yet, all too often I get CVs through that contain sensitive, financial or ID related information. I would like to say that ID theft is rare, but my research shows that ID theft is worth about £15Billion per year in the UK alone. So if you are unsure about what you should and should not include on your CV, here is a quick tick list of things to exclude from your CV:

Date of Birth – as well as not wanting to give the recruiter anything to discriminate against, your date of birth is quite a sensitive piece of data. It is often one of the security questions asked of you if you were to call your bank or credit card company….together with your full name, this can be dynamite in the hands of ID thieves. Treat the place of your birth as confidential too.

National Insurance Number – Believe it or not, I have seen this! If anyone asks you for your National Insurance number in an application, it should raise a huge red flag…and ring an alarm bell or two. You should only need to give your National Insurance Number when you get an offer of work – usually after an interview. If you are asked for it before…Check it out with someone who knows…call your local Job Centre, they will probably want to know who is doing this, the company may even be on their radar!

Driving Licence Number – You might be tempted to do this if you work as a driver of some variety and as with your NI number, you will have to show your Driving Licence before you are allowed in a company vehicle…probably at the interview, this is normal and if there is any driving to be done in the job you are going for, then it shouldn’t give cause for concern, but don’t make it easy by including it on your CV and posting it online.

Passport Number – If you are going to work abroad for a UK company, for example, as a holiday rep, then it is prudent on the part of the recruiter to check that your passport is in order and you will be able to get to your destination in time to start work. Same as the Driving Licence though, you should only have to do this if you are invited for interview. Keep it off the CV.

Bank Account details – A candidate may run the risk of appearing supremely confident; scratch that, over-confident…even cocky, if he or she were to include this in their application. Almost as if to say ‘you don’t need to see anyone else, here are my bank details for my first month’s salary.’ If you are asked to give these details or any other financial related data before an offer of work….? You guessed it…circling sharks…sinking boat…check it out first with the Job Centre.

Photograph – If you are a model or actor / actress or entertainer of any kind, then you are likely to have headshots, a portfolio or more commonly, a website with a gallery of images. The point is, it is normal to have a photo in your application for some types of work.

If you are asked for a photo in advance, it may be a cause for concern…there are all kinds of reasons why someone in I.T. for instance, would need to provide a photo. For an I.D. card, to be included on a company website under ‘Meet the Team.’ Never give your photo in advance. The other aspect of this is, unless the photo is professionally taken, it may give the wrong impression of you. I got one CV through with a photo…the person was on a night out!! Totally wrong impression!!

This list is not exhaustive, there could be any number of information you could be asked for in advance that seem a little sensitive, just check out the reasons why it is needed and verify what they tell you with an impartial source… a couple of other mentions you should avoid are Marital Status, number of children and nationality. If you need any advice on this, give me a quick call.

To summarise, keep the details on your CV to relevant only. When posting your CV online, it becomes ‘public domain’ and the details stay public pretty much forever, so it is best to include only basic information like your first name, town, email address (preferably a new Gmail or Yahoo account specifically set up for job hunting…and maybe a mobile number. Even if you remove your CV after an unwise posting, you have no idea of who has done a quick smash and grab ‘copy and paste’ hit on your CV!

Phishing Scams
You may well be aware of other kinds of phishing scams, but I am afraid that this kind of fraud has infiltrated the world of recruitment. As if it isn’t hard enough looking for work, the last thing you need is to get caught up in this kind of trap.
So what is a Phishing Scam?
We are pretty much conditioned into recognising logos, brands and icons, and it is kind of what you look for to make sure that you are in the right place. Shops, banks and other organisations use certain types of imagery to identify their product, but to anyone with any web-building skill, it is so easy to fabricate a fairly similar, even an exact clone of any website, but just because it looks like the Job Site you always use, doesn’t mean to say that it is authentic.
To give you an example, I am a regular user of Amazon, so I get emails from Amazon, promoting various books, and films that I may like to buy, based on previous purchases. If I see something I like, I don’t open my browser and type https://www.amazon.co.uk in there, I just click the link, usually, the logo at the top of the email.
A few weeks back though, I got what I thought (correctly) was a phishing email that looked like it was from Amazon, but it wasn’t! The email was basically telling me that a £600 TV was about to be dispatched to me…which was odd, because I had purchased no such thing. A pound to a penny, if I clicked the link I would have arrived at a site that looked like Amazon, but would have probably asked me to confirm several things, like my bank card number and other such financially sensitive data…a further check would have revealed the domain name in the URL bar to be nothing like Amazon’s address…I deleted it immediately after checking Amazon’s advice on potential phishing emails.
So to translate this into what we are talking about here, you may get an email from someone claiming to have seen your CV or profile or some other such description on http://www.yourfavouritejobhuntingsite.co.uk – and you have been matched to a job – “Click Here for More.” When you (and please don’t) click, you may arrive at what appears to be your favourite job site, but does the URL address agree with where you think you are? Are you being asked just to ‘verify’ a couple of details in order to see the job.
Be very wary when linking directly from email…just give it a check to make sure you are where you think you are. If you fish for phish…all you will get is Shark!!

There is so much more to this topic, there is a full guide available though, just drop me an email and I will send it over for free…keep safe!!

http://www.careervisa.co.uk/

Dave Smith Careers Visa

Dave Smith of Career Visa UK is our leading authority when it comes to personal careers advice.

He has worked in the UK recruitment industry since 1991 and is now an expert Jobsearch Consultant specialising in CV creation and improvement. If you need help in preparing to enter the Job Market for the first time or are planning on a career change – simply get in touch via his website http://www.careervisa.co.uk/. You can also read more at his online blog at http://careervisa.blogspot.com/